• Xception

WEAVING THE INTERIORS WITH THE EXTERIORS

Updated: Feb 12

1. INTRODUCE MORE GLAZING

Boost the glazed elements at the back of the house and render the view of the garden and the sky a part of the space. You may be able to add roof lights to the existing space, and they can be expanded.

A glass roof is more costly, and if you're ready to push the boat out, the glass beams can further reduce the indoor-outdoor barrier. Consider installing windows with a view of the garden if the original design of the house missed on them; it is often feasible under approved construction, but check the circumstances with local planners.

Windows may produce an unexpected view of a garden feature or landscape, so use glazing as a frame.










2. USE THE SAME FLOORING INDOORS AND OUT

the concrete, which stretches from the inside to the outside, draws the eye out with a continuous finish. bear in mind that the tiles used outside must be suitable for use in all weather conditions.

these need to be resistant to frost and have extra slip resistance, so they're not a risk when it's cold. make sure that the grotto is the same color as the uninterrupted concrete.

We need to be immune to frost and have extra slip resistance, so they're not at risk when it's cold. Make sure the cave is the same color as the uninterrupted concrete.

Rather than a wide paved patio area across the width of the building, divide it into a variety of areas. Each can have its own floor finish, which can be used for different activities, such as baking, outdoor dining and relaxing.


3. CHOOSE MATERIALS CAREFULLY

Incorporating outdoor finishes that are usually considered indoor option, and vice versa, essentially blurs the boundaries between the two regions. The exposed brick wall or brick slips into the kitchen-diner, for instance, can be connected to the exterior of the building.

Instead, paint garden walls and fences in colors that are often used inside – just make sure the exterior paint or stain is appropriate for your floor. You can also place wall tiles on planter boxes outside – but first verify that they are frost-proof.

Hanging a waterproof pendant light above an outdoor dining area is great for summer parties.



4. DESIGN THE SPACES AS ONE

Building on the back of your home? View the addition and the garden as one room, layout accordingly, and they will naturally feel more connected. Bench seating could be extended from the inside to the outside, for instance, while kitchen worktops could be placed in a runway that leads straight from the inside of the extension to create an outdoor kitchen.

Builtin elevated planters in the same material as the extension will also turn two separate areas into one harmonious whole.


5. CREATE AN OUTDOOR ROOM

Bring the living room to the greenhouse to make your home feel bigger all season. Furnishing outdoor space as you would indoor makes it feel like a continuation: think of endorsing upholstered sofas and armchairs.

Made for outdoor lounge furniture can stand up to garden life, and you can choose from a corner sofa that will zone the living area, or create sociable groups with sofas and chairs facing or at the right angle.



IMAGE COURTESY : INTERNET